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Animals

The crumpled carcass of a bull lies on U.S. Forest Service ground. It was among several killed and mutilated this summer in eastern Oregon. Anna King/Northwest News Network hide caption

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Anna King/Northwest News Network

'Not One Drop Of Blood': Cattle Mysteriously Mutilated In Oregon

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Swinomish tribal member Vernon Cayou gathers clams at Ala Spit County Park in Puget Sound. Megan Farmer /KUOW hide caption

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Megan Farmer /KUOW

Pacific Northwest Tribes Face Climate Change With Agricultural Ancient Practice

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Bear No. 68 has packed on the pounds needed for a long hibernation. Courtesy of NPS Photos hide caption

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Courtesy of NPS Photos

It's Fat Bear Week In Alaska's Katmai National Park — Time To Fill Out Your Bracket

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A 1,600-pound bull ventured on a short-lived quest for freedom Wednesday in West Baltimore, spending about three hours on the loose before finally succumbing to tranquilizers and being put back into the trailer whence he came. WUSA9/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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WUSA9/Screenshot by NPR

In the Netherlands, farmers block a major highway with their tractors on Tuesday during a national protest. Farmers say their livestock and operations are being unfairly blamed for greenhouse gas emissions. Vincent Jannink/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Vincent Jannink/AFP/Getty Images

Botswana has the world's largest elephant population, with some 130,000 animals. Greg Du Toit/Barcroft Images/Barcroft Media/Getty Images hide caption

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Greg Du Toit/Barcroft Images/Barcroft Media/Getty Images

It's estimated that more than half of the indoor cats in the U.S. are overweight. (Above) Miko the cat, aka "Miko Angelo," is seen before and after participation in a study about feline weight loss. Virginia Maryland College of Veterinary Medicine hide caption

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Virginia Maryland College of Veterinary Medicine

For Fat Cats, The Struggle Is Real When It Comes To Losing Weight And Keeping It Off

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(Left to right) Dark-eyed Junco, Eastern Meadowlark, Red-winged Blackbird Steven Mlodinow/EOL.org; Greg Lasley/EOL.org; dfwuw/EOL.org hide caption

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Steven Mlodinow/EOL.org; Greg Lasley/EOL.org; dfwuw/EOL.org

North America Has Lost 3 Billion Birds, Scientists Say

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This Japanese macaque is one of 40 images still in the running for the Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards. The winner will be announced in mid-November. Pablo Daniel Fernandez/Comedy Wildlife Photo Awards 2019 hide caption

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Pablo Daniel Fernandez/Comedy Wildlife Photo Awards 2019

The EPA says it aims to eliminate the testing of chemicals and pesticides in animals by 2035. filo/Getty Images hide caption

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filo/Getty Images

EPA Chief Pledges To Severely Cut Back On Animal Testing Of Chemicals

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Shariah Harris competed in the Amateur Cup tournament in Tully, N.Y., this past August. Courtesy of Lezlie Hiner hide caption

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Courtesy of Lezlie Hiner

Philly Teens 'Work To Ride' And Change The Face Of Polo

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Seeing dogs all day has its perks, veterinary neurologist Carrie Jurney says. But it also has downsides, including stress, debt, long hours and facing online harassment. Janet Delaney for NPR hide caption

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Janet Delaney for NPR

Veterinarians Are Killing Themselves. An Online Group Is There To Listen And Help

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The sounds of pleasant, relaxed bird chatter made eastern grey squirrels resume foraging more quickly after hearing the sounds of a predator, researchers found. Mike Kemp/In Pictures via Getty Images hide caption

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Mike Kemp/In Pictures via Getty Images

The Other Twitterverse: Squirrels Eavesdrop On Birds, Researchers Say

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Dr. Amir Khalil, a veterinarian with the animal rescue charity Four Paws International, carries a sedated coyote at a zoo in Rafah in the Gaza Strip, during the evacuation of animals in April. Said Khatib/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Said Khatib/AFP/Getty Images

As part of a national plan reassessing the status of animals and plants on the endangered species list, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has recommended that Key deer be "delisted due to recovery." Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

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Greg Allen/NPR

Trump Administration Opens Door To Dropping Florida's Key Deer From Endangered List

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Raedeyn Teton, left, and Jessica Broncho, race side-by-side in an Indian Relay on the Fort Hall Indian Reservation in Idaho. Russel Daniels/KUER hide caption

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Russel Daniels/KUER

Indian Relay Celebrates History And Culture Through Horse Racing

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Locusts swarm over Yemen's capital. Mohammed Huwais /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mohammed Huwais /AFP/Getty Images

Maybe The Way To Control Locusts Is By Growing Crops They Don't Like

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