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Energy

An aerial view shows downtown Los Angeles on April 30. U.S. miles driven decreased remarkably quickly in March, and driving slowly started to resume again — while remaining well below typical levels. Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images

An idle pump jack near Karnes City, Texas, last month. The industry has been divided over a proposal to limit production amid a devastating drop in demand and prices since the pandemic shutdown. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

The San Gabriel Mountains are seen under a clear sky beyond downtown Los Angeles. Air quality in the U.S. and elsewhere has been improved by reduced traffic from coronavirus restrictions and weeks of rainstorms. David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

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David McNew/Getty Images

Energy analysts say coal use is down so much that some power plants might run out of room to stockpile it. Reid Frazier/The Allegheny Front hide caption

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Reid Frazier/The Allegheny Front

Producers have kept pumping oil, even if they're not making money, partly because wells — once shut down — can be difficult to get back up and running. Here, a pump jack operates at Willow Springs Park in Long Beach, Calif. Apu Gomes/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Apu Gomes/AFP via Getty Images

On the now-digital and remote floor of the New York Stock Exchange, oil prices, along with the effects of the coronavirus, have kept stocks down. Johannes Eisele/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Johannes Eisele/AFP via Getty Images

If it's not possible to stop oil from a well blowout right away, MWCC has two production modules on stand-by. Once mounted on ships, they can process up to 100,000 barrels of oil a day for up to six months so it can be brought onshore by tankers. Jeff Brady/NPR hide caption

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Jeff Brady/NPR

10 Years After Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill, Industry Says It's Better Prepared

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An oil tanker sits at the port of Ras al-Khair in Saudi Arabia in December. The world is approaching the limits of its capacity to store and ship oil, thanks to an unprecedented glut. Giuseppe Cacace/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Giuseppe Cacace/AFP via Getty Images

The sun sets behind an idle pump jack near Karnes City, Texas, Wednesday, April 8, 2020. Demand for oil has fallen sharply since the coronavirus outbreak. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

An Austrian army member stands in front of OPEC's headquarters in Vienna on Thursday. Leonhard Foeger/Reuters hide caption

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Leonhard Foeger/Reuters

As Demand For Oil Dries Up, OPEC And Allies Agree To Historic Cuts In Output

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After a decade of protests in Nebraska and elsewhere, TC Energy has committed to building the controversial Keystone XL pipeline. Nati Harnik/AP hide caption

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Nati Harnik/AP

A wall of plastic trash at Garten Services in Salem, Ore., is headed to the landfill. The vast majority of plastic can't be or won't be recycled. Laura Sullivan/NPR hide caption

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Laura Sullivan/NPR

Plastic Wars: Industry Spent Millions Selling Recycling — To Sell More Plastic

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Clean energy advocates say economic disruption over the Covid-19 pandemic threatens tens of thousands of jobs and billions of dollars of investment in wind and solar. Above, wind turbines in Warsaw, N.Y. Julie Jacobson/AP hide caption

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Julie Jacobson/AP

Pump jacks draw crude oil from the Long Beach Oil Field near homes in Signal Hill, Calif., on March 9. The world's crude oil supply is rising even as demand is cratering. David McNew/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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David McNew/AFP via Getty Images

Sharon Lavigne and other members of Rise St. James, who oppose a recently approved chemical complex. They stand on its site, where archaeologists have discovered the graves of former slaves. Rolando Palacio hide caption

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Rolando Palacio

A crew near Karnes City, Texas, continued work as oil prices collapsed this week. Companies already were cutting costs and now will have to cut deeper as oil prices remain low. Jeff Brady/NPR hide caption

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Jeff Brady/NPR

Trump Steps In To Help Oil Industry Facing Its Own Coronavirus Crisis

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Gas prices have fallen markedly, and may continue to dip further, according to AAA. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Gas Prices Are Approaching $2

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