Environment Breaking news on the environment, climate change, pollution, and endangered species. Also featuring Climate Connections, a special series on climate change co-produced by NPR and National Geographic.

Environment

Forest biologist Patricia Maloney is raising 10,000 sugar pine seedlings descended from trees that survived California's historic drought. Lauren Sommer/KQED hide caption

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Lauren Sommer/KQED

Companies are increasingly concerned about how Earth's changing climate might affect their businesses, such as crop failures from drought, heat and storms. Julian Stratenschulte/picture alliance via Getty Image hide caption

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Julian Stratenschulte/picture alliance via Getty Image

As The Climate Warms, Companies Scramble To Calculate The Risk To Their Profits

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The Tongass National Forest, near Ketchikan, Alaska. The spruce, hemlock and cedar trees of the Tongass have been a source of timber for the logging industry. Elissa Nadworny/NPR hide caption

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Elissa Nadworny/NPR

A Moran tugboat nears the stern of the vessel Golden Ray as it lays on its side in Jekyll Island, Ga. The ship capsized last month and is still there on its side, leaking an unknown amount of fuel and oil. Stephen B. Morton/AP hide caption

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Stephen B. Morton/AP

Cargo Ship In Georgia Leaked Oil In Marsh After Overturning

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Mohammed Bawazeer (left) and Ian Riley carry a battery that will power the aeration system on Upper Klamath Lake for 32 hours, even if the sun isn't shining. Jes Burns/OPB hide caption

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Jes Burns/OPB

A month after Hurricane Dorian devastated the Bahamas, Sherrine Petit Homme LaFrance gets a hug from husband Ferrier Petit Homme. The storm destroyed their home on Grand Abaco Island. They are now living with China Laguerre in Nassau. Cheryl Diaz Meyer for NPR hide caption

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Cheryl Diaz Meyer for NPR

Swinomish tribal member Vernon Cayou gathers clams at Ala Spit County Park in Puget Sound. Megan Farmer /KUOW hide caption

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Megan Farmer /KUOW

Pacific Northwest Tribes Face Climate Change With Agricultural Ancient Practice

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Climate activists take part in a demonstration Monday in London, where police say they've arrested dozens of protesters as the Extinction Rebellion group attempts to draw attention to climate change. Alberto Pezzali/AP hide caption

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Alberto Pezzali/AP

Climate change activists from the group Extinction Rebellion demonstrate on Lambeth Bridge in central London on Monday. The group has planned protests in Europe, North America and Australia over the next two weeks. Isabel Infantes/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Isabel Infantes/AFP/Getty Images

How A Small English Town Spurred The Group That's Reshaping Global Climate Protests

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A minke whale breaks the surface near Boothbay Harbor in the Gulf of Maine on Aug. 10, 2018. Researchers say warming in the gulf is driving whales into waters farther north where fewer environmental protections exist. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty Images

The Gulf Of Maine Is Warming, And Its Whales Are Disappearing

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The ocean (right) and the lagoon (left) are separated by a thin strip of land in Funafuti, Tuvalu. The small South Pacific island nation is striving to mitigate the effects of climate change. Tuvalu's 11,000 inhabitants see effects such as rising sea levels in their daily life. Fiona Goodall/Getty Images for Lumix hide caption

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Fiona Goodall/Getty Images for Lumix