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A man exhales while smoking an e-cigarette. New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said the state will issue an emergency regulation banning certain flavored products amid a health scare linked to vaping. Robert F. Bukaty/AP hide caption

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Robert F. Bukaty/AP

Visitors and park rangers at historic Fort Scott check out a medevac helicopter operated by Midwest AeroCare during the Kansas town's Good Ol' Days festival. Sarah Jane Tribble/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Sarah Jane Tribble/Kaiser Health News

Air Ambulances Woo Rural Consumers With Memberships That May Leave Them Hanging

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An FDA committee voted to approve Palforzia, a new treatment for peanut allergy. The treatment is a form of oral immunotherapy intended to desensitize the immune system to peanuts. Lauri Patterson/Getty Images hide caption

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Lauri Patterson/Getty Images

With suicides on the rise, the government wants to make the national crisis hotline easier to use. A proposed three-digit number — 988 — could replace the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline, 1-800-273-TALK (8255). Jenny Kane/AP hide caption

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Jenny Kane/AP

Purdue Pharma, owned by members of the Sackler family, has tentatively struck a deal that would settle thousands of lawsuit brought by municipal and state governments alleging that the drug maker helped fuel the country's deadly opioid crisis. George Frey/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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George Frey/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Purdue Pharma Reaches Tentative Deal To Settle Thousands Of Opioid Lawsuits

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President Trump speaks to the press with first lady Melania Trump and Acting Food and Drug Administration Commissioner Norman Sharpless (left) and Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar in the Oval Office at the White House on Wednesday. Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images

FDA To Banish Flavored E-Cigarettes To Combat Youth Vaping

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These human embryo-like structures (top) were synthesized from human stem cells; they've been stained to illustrate different cell types. Images (bottom) of the "embryoids" in the new device that was invented to make them. Yi Zheng/University of Michigan, Ann Arbor hide caption

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Yi Zheng/University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

Scientists Create A Device That Can Mass-Produce Human Embryoids

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Tracy Lee for NPR

How To Teach Future Doctors About Pain In The Midst Of The Opioid Crisis

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Sheletta and Shawn Brundidge, alongside their four children, were the first fans to use the sensory room at the Minnesota Vikings' U.S. Bank Stadium. Opened during the August pre-season, the space comes with trained therapists and provides fans, including those with autism, a break from the excitement of the game. Tami Hedrick/Minnesota Vikings hide caption

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Tami Hedrick/Minnesota Vikings

Samuel Swedi, 22, is an electrical engineering student at Goma University in the Democratic Republic of Congo. He doesn't have a textbook — just whatever notes he has written in his notebook. Samantha Reinders for NPR hide caption

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Samantha Reinders for NPR

The EPA says it aims to eliminate the testing of chemicals and pesticides in animals by 2035. filo/Getty Images hide caption

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filo/Getty Images

EPA Chief Pledges To Severely Cut Back On Animal Testing Of Chemicals

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Millions of homes built before 1978 still contain lead-based paint. A report published Monday finds the Environmental Protection Agency is not adequately enforcing laws meant to protect children from lead-laden paint flakes and dust. Stew Milne/AP hide caption

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Stew Milne/AP