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Latin America

Bolivian President Evo Morales (right) with Vice President Álvaro García Linera launch their campaign for reelection in Chimore, Cochabamba department, Bolivia on May 18. The election is set for Oct. 20. Noah Friedman-Rudovsky/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Noah Friedman-Rudovsky/AFP/Getty Images

How Bolivia's Evo Morales Could Win A 4th Term As President

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Acting Secretary of Homeland Security Kevin McAleenan holds a news conference in June. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Acting Homeland Security Secretary Kevin McAleenan Is Out

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Grandmother Maria Jose holds her twin granddaughters Heloisa (right) and Heloa Barbosa, both born with microcephaly, during their one-year birthday party on April 16, 2017, in Areia, Paraiba state, Brazil. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Indigenous anti-government protesters march Tuesday into Ecuador's capital, Quito, where days of popular upheaval have followed President Lenín Moreno's decision to scrap fuel price subsidies. Dolores Ochoa/AP hide caption

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Dolores Ochoa/AP

A maintenance worker sweeps the street as riot police block the door to the Congress building Tuesday in Lima. Late Tuesday night, Mercedes Aráoz, the vice president who had briefly accepted the mantle of acting president from lawmakers, performed a surprise U-turn by announcing her resignation. Martin Mejia/AP hide caption

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Martin Mejia/AP

A supporter of Peruvian President Martín Vizcarra chants slogans outside the legislature building in Lima on Monday night, not long after Vizcarra dissolved Congress. Opposition lawmakers defied the president's order and voted to suspend him from office. Rodrigo Abd/AP hide caption

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Rodrigo Abd/AP

A U.S. Customs and Border Protection officer waits for migrants who are applying for asylum in the U.S. to arrive at International Bridge 1 where they will cross from Nuevo Laredo, Mexico, to Laredo, Texas, early Sept. 17, 2019. Fernando Llano/AP hide caption

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Fernando Llano/AP

Advocates Say President Trump's Immigration Policy Is 'A Tool Of Cruelty'

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Corn from a fall harvest in Guatemala. John Seaton Callahan/Getty Images hide caption

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John Seaton Callahan/Getty Images

In Guatemala, A Bad Year For Corn — And For U.S. Aid

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José José sings at Teatro Metropolitan in March 2014 in Mexico City. The artist died Sept. 28, 2019 at age 71. Medios y Media/Getty Images hide caption

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Medios y Media/Getty Images

José José, Mexico's Prince Of Song, Dies At 71

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Since taking office last December, Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador has not left his country. Critics say he is damaging Mexico's image on the world stage. Above, he speaks during the daily morning press briefing in Mexico City on Sept. 5. Pedro Martin Gonzalez Castillo/Getty Images hide caption

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Pedro Martin Gonzalez Castillo/Getty Images

Acting Secretary of Homeland Security Kevin K. McAleenan, right, with Alexandra Hill Tinoco, left, minister of Foreign Affairs for El Salvador, after signing an asylum agreement in Washington, D.C. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

A wildfire blazes near the town of Roboré, in eastern Bolivia's Santa Cruz region, on Aug. 21. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/Getty Images

Bolivia Is Fighting Major Forest Fires Nearly As Large As In Brazil

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Eulalio Barrera Barrera's family was one of 6,000 to receive a monthly stipend funded by USAID that was cut off last month because of President Trump's foreign aid funding freeze. Like many families in the program, he spent the last cash on chickens. Tim McDonnell for NPR hide caption

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Tim McDonnell for NPR

Twelve-year-old Jesús Ruiz grieves as he stands before the coffin containing the remains of his father, Mexican journalist Jorge Celestino Ruiz Vazquez, in Actopan, Veracruz, on Aug. 3. The Committee to Protect Journalists said Ruiz Vazquez was the third journalist killed in a single week in Mexico. Felix Marquez/AP hide caption

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Felix Marquez/AP

12 Journalists Have Been Killed In Mexico This Year, The World's Highest Toll

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Reknowned chef José Andrés (right) is interviewed by ABC News last week in the Bahamian capital, Nassau, before heading to the Abaco Islands to deliver food to people stranded left by Hurricane Dorian. Cheryl Diaz Meyer for NPR hide caption

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Cheryl Diaz Meyer for NPR

How To Help Hurricane Dorian Survivors In The Bahamas

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Workers prune marijuana plants at a Clever Leaves greenhouse in Pesca, Colombia. The company employs over 450 people. Courtesy of Clever Leaves hide caption

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Courtesy of Clever Leaves

Colombia Is Turning Into A Major Medical Marijuana Producer

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Twin brothers Ivan (left) and Jose López expect to make about $6 a month each when they start work as nurses this month. To boost their income, they care for elderly individuals living at home. Gustavo Ocando Alex for NPR hide caption

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Gustavo Ocando Alex for NPR

Elena Hinestrosa and her ensemble, Integración Pacífica, perform at one of Petronio Alvarez Music Festival's educational panels. Maria Paz Gutierrez hide caption

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Maria Paz Gutierrez

Colombia's Big Summer Music Festival Is All About Blackness

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Young men practice rugby at Hacienda Santa Teresa, an estate belonging to a Venezuelan rum company. The estate serves as a practice field for neighboring communities of Aragua state, using rugby to help at-risk youths stay away from criminal life and violence. Adriana Loureiro Fernández for NPR hide caption

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Adriana Loureiro Fernández for NPR

In Venezuela, A Rum-Maker Gives Gang Members A Way Out — Via Rugby

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