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Latin America

In an image from a YouTube video released on Aug. 29, 2019, shows Former senior commander Iván Márquez (center) and fugitive rebel colleague, Jesús Santrich (wearing sunglasses), of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia at an undisclosed location announcing they are taking up arms again. AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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AFP via Getty Images

Brazil's health minister, Nelson Teich, resigned from his post Friday after only a few weeks on the job. Teich is the second health minister to depart in a month. Eraldo Peres/AP hide caption

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Eraldo Peres/AP

A cyclist crosses Plaza de Mayo in the center of Buenos Aires on April 30. Argentina is loosening its strict lockdown but keeping most restrictions in the capital in place. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

A busy market near the state hospital in downtown Port-au-Prince. Despite a halt to air travel and other lockdown measures, Port-au-Prince looks as busy as ever, observers say. Pierre Michel Jean /AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Pierre Michel Jean /AFP via Getty Images

COVID-19 Cases Double In Ill-Prepared Haiti

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This photograph released by the Venezuelan government purports to show the ID cards confiscated from Airan Berry and Luke Denman in Caracas. The former U.S. service members are now in detention after Venezuelan security forces stifled an ill-fated raid earlier this week. Miraflores Palace presidential press office via AP hide caption

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Miraflores Palace presidential press office via AP

Guatemalan immigration officials use protective equipment as a preventive measure against the new coronavirus as they receive Guatemalan migrants deported from the U.S., at the Air Force base in Guatemala City on March 12. Johan Ordonez/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Johan Ordonez/AFP via Getty Images

The Navy destroyer USS Pinckney and the U.S. Coast Guard cutter USCGC Northland sailed together in the Eastern Pacific on April 26. The ships are part of an "enhanced" push to stop cocaine smuggling. Petty Officer 3rd Class Erick Parsons/U.S. Navy hide caption

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Petty Officer 3rd Class Erick Parsons/U.S. Navy

Mexican lucha libre wrestler Hijo del Soberano sews face masks since his matches have stopped due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Jam Media/Getty Images hide caption

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Jam Media/Getty Images

On the edge of this southern beech tree forest, photographer Andria Hautamaki has just enough cell service to use her phone as a mobile hotspot, and then share the connection with her computer. Andria Hautamaki for NPR hide caption

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Andria Hautamaki for NPR

Venezuelan migrants in Colombia walk toward the border amid the coronavirus lockdown. Colombian officials say 12,000 Venezuelans have taken buses back to their home country since Colombia imposed restrictions to stop the outbreak. Fernando Vergara/AP hide caption

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Fernando Vergara/AP

Thousands Of Migrants Head Back To Venezuela To Flee Colombia's COVID-19 Lockdown

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Salvadoran President Nayib Bukele, pictured in February, has authorized police to use lethal force against gang members who allegedly ordered murders to take advantage of police attention to the coronavirus. Marvin Recinos/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Marvin Recinos/AFP via Getty Images

Relatives mourn at the site of a mass burial at the Nossa Senhora Aparecida cemetery, in Manaus, Amazonas state, Brazil, on Tuesday. The cemetery is carrying out burials in common graves due to the large number of deaths from COVID-19 disease, according to a cemetery official. Edmar Barros/AP hide caption

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Edmar Barros/AP

'Living Through A Nightmare': Brazil's Manaus Digs A Mass Grave As Deaths Mount

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Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro prepares to speak to supporters protesting against quarantine and social distancing measures to combat the new coronavirus outbreak in Brasilia on Sunday. EVARISTO SA/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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EVARISTO SA/AFP via Getty Images

Patients are treated for COVID-19 at a field hospital in Guayaquil, Ecuador. Enrique Ortiz/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Enrique Ortiz/AFP via Getty Images

COVID-19 Numbers Are Bad In Ecuador. The President Says The Real Story Is Even Worse

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A driver turns back after U.S. border agents rejected his entry last month on an international bridge at the U.S-Mexico border that joins Ciudad Juarez and El Paso. Mexico and the U.S. have extended travel restrictions over their busy shared border as they try to control the spread of the coronavirus pandemic. Christian Chavez/AP Photo hide caption

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Christian Chavez/AP Photo

Uganda's Bobi Wine, left, and Puerto Rico's Bad Bunny have released songs about the coronavirus. Joel Saget/AFP via Getty Images; John Parra/Getty Images for Spotify hide caption

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Joel Saget/AFP via Getty Images; John Parra/Getty Images for Spotify

People wear face masks as a preventive measure against the spread of the new coronavirus, COVID-19 at a market in Managua, on April 16, 2020, a day after Nicaraguan President Daniel Ortega spoke of the coronavirus pandemic and announced there would be no quarantine or cessation of economic activity. INTI OCON/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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INTI OCON/AFP via Getty Images

Nicaragua Not Backing Down Despite Criticism Over Lax Measures During Pandemic

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Women wearing face masks stand at a safe distance to help curb the spread of the new coronavirus, as they wait for food assigned to their children outside a school in Xesuj, Guatemala, where many residents depend on remittances, largely from the U.S. The fallout from the pandemic is cutting into the financial lifelines for people across Latin America, Africa and Asia. Moises Castillo/AP hide caption

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Moises Castillo/AP

Brazil's President Jair Bolsonaro speaks to reporters in Brasilia on Thursday. Sergio Lima/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Sergio Lima/AFP via Getty Images

An immigration worker in an orange jacket carries a young Guatemalan deported from the U.S., followed by another deportee, at La Aurora International Airport in Guatemala City on March 12. Moises Castillo/AP hide caption

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Moises Castillo/AP

A Haitian police officer locks a gate that separates the Dominican Republic border town Jimaní from Malpasse, Haiti, last month, as Haitian authorities shut down the border because of concerns over the spread of COVID-19. Dieu Nalio Chery/AP hide caption

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Dieu Nalio Chery/AP