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Migrants, pictured in September 2019, apply for asylum in the United States in a tent courtroom in Laredo, Texas. On Jan. 2, the U.S. government began sending asylum-seekers back to Nogales, Mexico, to await court hearings that will be scheduled roughly 350 miles away in Juarez, Mexico. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerry Nadler, D-N.Y., wants access to witnesses and documents as part of a look into potential political influence at the Justice Department. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

Lee Boyd Malvo, the 'D.C. Sniper.' The U.S. Supreme Court agreed to dismiss a pending case after the state changed a criminal sentencing law for juveniles. Virginia Department of Corrections /AP hide caption

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Virginia Department of Corrections /AP

An airplane arrives at London's Heathrow Airport on Thursday — the same day a court blocked plans for a third runway at the airport, citing the government's climate change commitments. Chris J. Ratcliffe/Getty Images hide caption

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Chris J. Ratcliffe/Getty Images

Rep. Bobby Rush, D-Ill., speaks during a news conference about the Emmett Till Antilynching Act on Wednesday on Capitol Hill. He stands beside a photo of Emmett Till, a 14-year-old African American who was lynched in Mississippi in the 1950s. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

"Walking off the job, you're taking on your boss head-on, and that sounds like some pretty scary stuff, right?" says fast-food worker Terrence Wise, shown here at a 2013 strike in Kansas City, Mo. "But I always thought, what am I more afraid of? Taking on my boss or being homeless again with my three little girls?" Courtesy of Fight for $15 and a Union hide caption

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Courtesy of Fight for $15 and a Union

'Gives Me Hope': How Low-Paid Workers Rose Up Against Stagnant Wages

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Ronda Goldfein, who leads the Philadelphia nonprofit Safehouse, says the group will open the first supervised injection site in the country next week over objections of the Department of Justice and some community members. Natalie Piserchio for NPR hide caption

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Natalie Piserchio for NPR

Philadelphia Nonprofit Opening Nation's First Supervised Injection Site Next Week

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Lashonia Thompson-El, who spent 18 years in prison, says she once was placed in solitary confinement for three months after making an unauthorized phone call to her 10-year-old daughter. Joseph Shapiro/NPR hide caption

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Joseph Shapiro/NPR

Federal Report Says Women In Prison Receive Harsher Punishments Than Men

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The U.S. Supreme Court justices questioned how broadly a federal law targeting immigration advice could be used. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

Supreme Court Rules On Cross-Border Justice, Debates Free Speech On Immigration

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Attorney Cristobal Galindo, center, is accompanied by Jesus Hernandez, left, and Maria Guereca, and attorney Marion Reilly in front of the Supreme Court, in Nov. 2019. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

Former New York City Mayor Mike Bloomberg defended the "stop-and-frisk" policy for years, until he launched his presidential bid. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Mike Bloomberg Can't Shake The Legacy Of Stop-And-Frisk Policing In New York

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Judge Amy Berman Jackson, shown in a courtroom sketch, has been at the center of a series of high-profile Russia cases — most recently, one involving self-proclaimed "dirty trickster" Roger Stone. Dana Verkouteren/AP hide caption

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Dana Verkouteren/AP

Spotlight Lands On Amy Berman Jackson, Judge In Stone Case, After A Lengthy Career

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Supporters of WikiLeaks co-founder Julian Assange hold U.S. and U.K. flags outside Woolwich Crown Court in southeast London on Monday as his extradition hearing begins. Daniel Leal-Olivas/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Leal-Olivas/AFP via Getty Images

Sarah Ziegenhorn and Andy Beeler shared a selfie while hiking in Texas' Big Bend National Park in December 2018. Beeler died of an opioid overdose last March. Ziegenhorn traces his death to the many obstacles to medical care that Beeler experienced while on parole. Sarah Ziegenhorn hide caption

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Sarah Ziegenhorn

They Fell In Love Helping Drug Users. But Fear Kept Him From Helping Himself

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U.S. District Judge Amy Berman Jackson refused to remove herself from Roger Stone's case, two days after his defense team filed a motion for her disqualification because of alleged bias. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

MICHAEL MILKEN IN LOS ANGELES (Photo by Ted Soqui/Sygma via Getty Images) Ted Soqui/Sygma via Getty Images hide caption

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Ted Soqui/Sygma via Getty Images

Episode 974: Michael Milken

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Authorities say Wells Fargo bank managers were aware of illegal conduct as early as 2002 but allowed it to continue until 2016. Christopher Dilts/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Christopher Dilts/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Wells Fargo Paying $3 Billion To Settle U.S. Case Over Fraudulent Customer Accounts

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Andrew Downs, senior regional director for the southern region of the Appalachian Trail Conservancy, stands at the approximate spot where the pipeline would cross underground. Becky Sullivan/NPR hide caption

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Becky Sullivan/NPR

Supreme Court Pipeline Fight Could Disrupt How The Appalachian Trail Is Run

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