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Facebook says it's dedicating $100 million to prop up news organizations pummeled by the financial effects of the coronavirus pandemic. Loic Venance/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Loic Venance/AFP via Getty Images

Facebook Pledges $100 Million To Aid News Outlets Hit Hard By Pandemic

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ESPN's Karl Ravech reports on the cancellation of the SEC Men's Basketball Tournament on March 12, in Nashville. With no live sports to show, the network is scrambling to fill the time. Its offerings now include diversions like cherry pit spitting and marble racing. Andy Lyons/Getty Images hide caption

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Andy Lyons/Getty Images

Historic Games, Documentaries And ... Marble Races: ESPN Without Live Sports

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Zeynep Tufekci on the TED stage. Ryan Lash/Ryan Lash / TED hide caption

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Ryan Lash/Ryan Lash / TED

Zeynep Tufekci: How Do We Build Systems Of Trust Online?

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Journalists wearing face masks — in an effort to protect against the coronavirus — gather for a news conference earlier this year in Beijing. Early Wednesday, China said it was planning to pull the press credentials of certain journalists employed by a handful of major U.S.-based newspapers. Noel Celis/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Noel Celis/AFP via Getty Images

The New York Times' exposé of star litigator David Boies' efforts against Jeffrey Epstein's estate and social circle took inspiration from a source who appears to have lied. Did the reporting hold up? Carlo Allegri/Reuters hide caption

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Carlo Allegri/Reuters

'The New York Times,' The Unreliable Source And The Exposé That Missed The Mark

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PBS fired Smiley, pictured in 2016, after allegations of sexual misconduct surfaced against the talk show host. During the civil trial, jurors heard from six women who said they were subjected to unwanted sexual advances from him. Rich Fury/Rich Fury/Invision/AP hide caption

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Rich Fury/Rich Fury/Invision/AP

The Trump campaign has filed a lawsuit against The Washington Post. Eric Baradat/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Eric Baradat/AFP via Getty Images

Trump 2020 Sues 'Washington Post,' Days After 'N.Y. Times' Defamation Suit

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A masked paramilitary policeman stands guard alone at a deserted Tiananmen Gate in Beijing following the coronavirus outbreak. China on Wednesday said it has revoked the press credentials of three U.S. reporters over a headline for an opinion column it deems racist and slanderous. Andy Wong/AP hide caption

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Andy Wong/AP

McClatchy acquired Knight Ridder, the owner of the Miami Herald and dozens of other newspapers, in 2006 but sold off several of those papers. Joe Skipper/Reuters hide caption

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Joe Skipper/Reuters

Producer Darius Rafieyan holds his betting slip after placing a bet on the Oscars' Best Picture category in Atlantic City, N.J. Darius Rafieyan/NPR hide caption

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Darius Rafieyan/NPR

Betting On The Oscars

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Gwen Ifill, one of the nation's most esteemed journalists, will be the face of the U.S. Post Office 43rd stamp in the Black Heritage series. USPS via AP hide caption

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USPS via AP

Journalist Gwen Ifill Honored With Black Heritage Forever Stamp

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Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, accompanied by (from left) Rep. Mike Johnson, R-La., Rep. Mark Meadows, R-N.C., Rep. Lee Zeldin, R-N.Y., and Rep. Elise Stefanik, R-N.Y., speak to the media on Capitol Hill about the Senate impeachment trial. Jose Luis Magana/AP hide caption

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Jose Luis Magana/AP

The phone of Jeff Bezos, Amazon CEO and owner of The Washington Post, reportedly was hacked via a WhatsApp account owned by Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman. Cliff Owen/AP hide caption

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Cliff Owen/AP

U.N. Urges Probe Of Reported Hacking Of Jeff Bezos' Phone By Saudi Arabia

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Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, speaks with reporters after a vote. Journalists' normal access is being constrained for the impeachment trial. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP