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Special counsel Robert Mueller walks with his wife, Ann, in Washington, D.C., on Sunday. The Justice Department is expected to send a summary of his findings to Congress. Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images hide caption

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Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

A copy of Attorney General William Barr's letter to Congress regarding the conclusion of special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation is arranged for a photograph in Washington, D.C. Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg via Getty Images

Attorney General William Barr, seen leaving his home on March 21, will determine how much of the Mueller report to release to Congress and the public. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Attorney Emmet Bondurant holds a map of Georgia's congressional districts around the early 1960s, exhibit #9 in the Wesberry v. Sanders case he argued before the Supreme Court as a young lawyer. Johnny Kaufman/WABE hide caption

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Johnny Kaufman/WABE

Attorney General William Barr is being urged by both Democrats and Republicans to make special counsel Robert Mueller's final report public. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Copies of a letter from Attorney General William Barr advising Congress that Special Counsel Robert Mueller has concluded his investigation. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

Robert Mueller Submits Report On Russia Investigation To Attorney General

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Robert Mueller testifies during a Senate hearing in 2013. The former FBI director was appointed special counsel in the spring of 2017 after President Trump fired FBI Director James Comey. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Sen. Bernie Sanders, appearing at a campaign stop in Concord, N.H., raised about $6 million in the first day of his 2020 presidential campaign, which was evidence that he has maintained strong grassroots support. Steven Senne/AP hide caption

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Steven Senne/AP

Attorney General William Barr departs his home on Friday in McLean, Va. Barr notified Congress that he has received special counsel Robert Mueller's report on his investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Presidential candidate Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., at an organizing event in February. Warren says she wants to get rid of the Electoral College, and vote for president using a national popular vote. John Locher/AP hide caption

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John Locher/AP

Abolishing The Electoral College Would Be More Complicated Than It May Seem

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While Sen. Elizabeth Warren, seen speaking in Iowa, may be dominating the policy debate, there is little evidence that voters are rewarding politicians who flesh out their plans over others with strong personal brands. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Chief Justice John Roberts attends the 37th Kennedy Center Honors at the Kennedy Center on Dec. 7, 2014, in Washington, DC. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

In 'The Chief,' An Enigmatic, Conservative John Roberts Walks A Political Tightrope

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Rep. Abigail Spanberger attends a town hall at Nottoway High School in Crewe, Va. She was one of dozens of new members who ousted Republicans on a pledge to buck party leaders and work across the aisle. Matt Eich for NPR hide caption

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Matt Eich for NPR

Moderate Democrats Under Pressure As Party's Left Grabs Attention

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Stephen Moore, a conservative commentator and former Trump campaign adviser, has joined the president in criticizing the Federal Reserve. Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call Inc. hide caption

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Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call Inc.

Senior adviser to the President Jared Kushner used private email and a messaging app to conduct official business, the House oversight committee says. Kushner's lawyer has pushed back on some of the committee's assertions. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Kushner Used Private Email To Conduct Official Business, House Committee Says

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Wisconsin Gov. Tony Evers, a Democrat, delivers the State of the State address on Jan. 22. On Thursday, a Wisconsin county judge restored the governor's powers that had been restricted by Republicans during a lame-duck session. Andy Manis/AP hide caption

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Andy Manis/AP

House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer supports raising member and staff pay, as well as reviving earmarks. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Acting Secretary of Defense Patrick Shanahan listens as President Trump speaks during a signing event for Space Policy Directive 4 in the Oval Office last month. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP