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A recent study looked at funding rates for R01 grant applications, which are designed to support "health-related research and development based on the mission of the NIH." In general, population-based projects were less likely to be funded than explorations of cellular mechanisms, the study found. Will & Deni McIntyre/Science Source hide caption

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Will & Deni McIntyre/Science Source

Unlike most dairy cows in America, which are descended from just two bulls, this cow at Pennsylvania State University has a different ancestor: She is the daughter of a bull that lived decades ago, called University of Minnesota Cuthbert. The bull's frozen semen was preserved by the U.S. Agriculture Department. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

Most U.S. Dairy Cows Are Descended From Just 2 Bulls. That's Not Good

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Already, Health Canada has posted safety and efficacy data online for four newly approved drugs; it plans to release reports for another 13 drugs and three medical devices approved or rejected since March. Teerapat Seedafong/EyeEm/Getty Images hide caption

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Teerapat Seedafong/EyeEm/Getty Images

Although Gray will finally go home to Forest, Miss., she will return to Nashville once a month for four months to undergo blood tests and a bone marrow biopsy. But, she says, the hardest part is over. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

A Patient Hopes Gene-Editing Can Help With Pain Of Sickle Cell Disease

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Grandmother Maria Jose holds her twin granddaughters Heloisa (right) and Heloa Barbosa, both born with microcephaly, during their one-year birthday party on April 16, 2017, in Areia, Paraiba state, Brazil. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Depression symptoms dropped significantly in a group of young adults who ate a Mediterranean-style diet for three weeks. It's the latest study to show that food can influence mental health. Claudia Totir/Getty Images hide caption

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Jan Stromme/Getty Images

The parts of the scroll were scanned using shortwave-infrared hyperspectral imaging. A. Tournié, Centre de Recherche sur la Conservation hide caption

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A. Tournié, Centre de Recherche sur la Conservation

Ancient Greek Scroll's Hidden Contents Revealed Through Infrared Imaging

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A new study finds that tuna harvests, including of some species considered "vulnerable," have increased by an astonishing 1,000% in the last 60 years — a rate that some scientists warn is unsustainable. NiCK/Getty Images hide caption

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NiCK/Getty Images

The long arms of pivot irrigation rigs deliver water from the Ogallala Aquifer to circular fields of corn in northwestern Kansas. A new study suggests many of the world's rivers and streams could dry up because people are draining underground aquifers that sustain streams through dry periods. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

Irrigation For Farming Could Leave Many Of The World's Streams And Rivers Dry

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A worker cuts black granite to make a countertop. Though granite, marble and "engineered stone" all can produce harmful silica dust when cut, ground or polished, the artificial stone typically contains much more silica, says a CDC researcher tracking cases of silicosis. danishkhan/Getty Images hide caption

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danishkhan/Getty Images

Workers Are Falling Ill, Even Dying, After Making Kitchen Countertops

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After finishing up some household chores, Brody Knapp gets a chance to play with his mother, Ashley, at their home in Kansas City, Mo. Alex Smith/KCUR hide caption

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Alex Smith/KCUR

Pediatricians Stand By Meds For ADHD, But Some Say Therapy Should Come First

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U.S. adults put on about a pound a year on average. But people who had a regular nut-snacking habit put on less weight and had a lower risk of becoming obese over time, a new study finds. R.Tsubin/Getty Images hide caption

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R.Tsubin/Getty Images

Just A Handful Of Nuts May Help Keep Us From Packing On The Pounds As We Age

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Triathletes who trained too much chose immediate gratification over long-term rewards, researchers found. Markus Büsges/EyeEm/Getty Images hide caption

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Markus Büsges/EyeEm/Getty Images

Too Much Training Can Tax Athletes' Brains

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A selection of small feeding vessels dating back to the late Bronze Age and early Iron Age. Researchers now say vessels like these were used as prehistoric baby bottles. Katharina Rebay-Salisbury hide caption

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Katharina Rebay-Salisbury

An employee of the Boston biotech company Ginkgo Bioworks runs a gene sequencing machine through its paces. The company synthesizes thousands of genes a month, which are then inserted into cells that become mini factories of useful products. Tim Llewellyn/Copperhound Pictures/Ginkgo Bioworks hide caption

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Tim Llewellyn/Copperhound Pictures/Ginkgo Bioworks

As Made-To-Order DNA Gets Cheaper, Keeping It Out Of The Wrong Hands Gets Harder

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On the advice of a co-worker, Dehne joined a six-week program through which she learned how to safely walk to ease her pain. Now Dehne briskly walks for exercise and enjoyment multiple times a week. Her knees, she says, "don't hurt me anymore." Eamon Queeney for NPR hide caption

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Eamon Queeney for NPR

Exercising To Ease Pain: Taking Brisk Walks Can Help

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(Left to right) Dark-eyed Junco, Eastern Meadowlark, Red-winged Blackbird Steven Mlodinow/EOL.org; Greg Lasley/EOL.org; dfwuw/EOL.org hide caption

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Steven Mlodinow/EOL.org; Greg Lasley/EOL.org; dfwuw/EOL.org

North America Has Lost 3 Billion Birds, Scientists Say

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Ric Peralta and his wife Lisa are both able to check Ric's blood sugar levels at any time, using the Dexcom app and an arm patch that measures the levels and sends the information wirelessly. Allison Zaucha for NPR hide caption

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Allison Zaucha for NPR

It's Not Just Insulin: Diabetes Patients Struggle To Get Crucial Supplies

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