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A pharmacy tech pours out pills of hydroxychloroquine May 20 at Rock Canyon Pharmacy in Provo, Utah. After a study found COVID-19 patients using the drug were dying at higher rates, the World Health Organization announced it would suspend its clinical trial. George Frey/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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George Frey/AFP via Getty Images

A recent study found that black doctors were more effective than non-black doctors at convincing black men to use preventative health services. Angela Hsieh hide caption

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Angela Hsieh

Glacier mice in Iceland. Ruth Mottram hide caption

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Ruth Mottram

Herd Of Fuzzy Green 'Glacier Mice' Baffles Scientists

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"The two most replicated, robust factors linked to suicide are economic change — downturn — and social disconnection," says Dr. Roger McIntyre, professor of psychiatry at the University of Toronto. And both factors, he notes, are major hallmarks of the COVID-19 pandemic. Fanatic Studio/Gary Waters/Getty Images hide caption

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Fanatic Studio/Gary Waters/Getty Images

Act Now To Get Ahead Of A Mental Health Crisis, Specialists Advise U.S.

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It's not the pill. It's the doctor-patient relationship. Angela Hsieh/NPR hide caption

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Angela Hsieh/NPR

After testing positive for COVID-19, Diana Berrent established Survivor Corps, a grassroots clearinghouse for COVID-19 survivors interested in donating blood plasma to organizations developing therapies that might combat the disease. Diana Berrent/Survivor Corps hide caption

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Diana Berrent/Survivor Corps

The serious inflammatory syndrome sending some children and teens to the hospital remains extremely uncommon, doctors say. But if your child spikes a high, persistent fever, and has severe abdominal pain with vomiting that doesn't make them feel better, call your doctor as a precaution. Sally Anscombe/Getty Images hide caption

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Sally Anscombe/Getty Images

Mystery Inflammatory Syndrome In Kids And Teens Likely Linked To COVID-19

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Scientists with the European Southern Observatory say system HR 6819, seen in this artist's rendering, is composed primarily of two stars (orbits in blue) and a newly discovered black hole (orbit in red). The black hole is invisible, but it makes its presence known by the gravitational pull exerted on objects around it. ESO/L. Calçada hide caption

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ESO/L. Calçada
Klaus Vedfelt/Getty Images

A copy of the final edition of the Rocky Mountain News sits in a newspaper box on a street corner in Denver, Colorado. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

Stop The Presses! Newspapers Affect Us, Often In Ways We Don't Realize

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An illustration shows spiky antigens studding the virus's outer coat. Tests under development that look for these antigens might be faster than PCR tests for diagnosing COVID-19, proponents say. But the tests might still need PCR-test confirmation. Sergii Iaremenko/Science Photo Library/Getty Images hide caption

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Sergii Iaremenko/Science Photo Library/Getty Images

A Next-Generation Coronavirus Test Raises Hopes And Concerns

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A project in San Francisco to estimate spread of the coronavirus in hard-hit neighborhoods has expanded testing to everyone over age 4 in a broad swath of the Mission District this week, including at a pop-up site at Garfield Square. Eric Westervelt/NPR hide caption

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Eric Westervelt/NPR

San Francisco Enlists A Key Latino Neighborhood In Coronavirus Testing

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A patient with COVID-19, who is on a ventilator in the isolation room at the National Koranyi Pulmonology Institute of Budapest. Karoly Arvai/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Karoly Arvai/AFP via Getty Images

A pathologist holds a vial from a COVID-19 test kit. Various bottlenecks in the U.S. that have constrained widespread testing for the coronavirus were problems in February and persist today. Michael Nagle/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Nagle/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Why The Warning That Coronavirus Was On The Move In U.S. Cities Came So Late

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Fissure 21 of the Kilauea volcano is seen on May 22, 2018, in the Leilani Estates subdivision of Pahoa, Hawaii. Ronit Fahl/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ronit Fahl/AFP via Getty Images

Did Heavy Rain Cause Hawaii's Historic Volcanic Eruption?

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People stand in line as they wait to get tested for COVID-19 at a just-opened testing center in the Harlem section of New York on Monday. Seth Wenig/AP hide caption

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Seth Wenig/AP

Study Raises Questions About False Negatives From Quick COVID-19 Test

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Response coordinator for White House Coronavirus Task Force Deborah Birx, on March 31, points to a graphic displaying data from the IHME model, one of several models public health officials are using to help make decisions about the pandemic. Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

Coronavirus Models Aren't "Wrong." That's Not How They Work.

Scientific models of disease don't predict the future. They're just one tool to help us all prepare for it. NPR global health correspondent Nurith Aizenman explains how scientific models of disease are built and how they're used by public health experts. We also look at one influential model forecasting when individual states might begin to reopen.

Coronavirus Models Aren't "Wrong." That's Not How They Work.

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Mammoth Biosciences and researchers at the University of California, San Francisco are working on a coronavirus test that could run multiple samples at once, with results in 35-40 minutes. Even better, they say, it doesn't require the sophisticated, expensive equipment used in other tests for the virus. Mammoth Biosciences hide caption

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Mammoth Biosciences

CRISPR And Spit Might Be Keys To Faster, Cheaper, Easier Tests For The Coronavirus

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With research projects on hold due to social distancing guidelines, scientists are being forced to decide what to do with the creatures that they study. Above, a Chilean rose tarantula on display at an exhibition in Hannover, Germany on Nov. 23, 2019. Peter Steffen/dpa/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Peter Steffen/dpa/AFP via Getty Images

Bring Home The Tarantulas? As Research Halts, Scientists Face Difficult Decisions

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When you listen to a story, your brain waves actually start to synchronize with those of the storyteller. And reading a narrative activates brain regions involved in deciphering or imagining a person's motives and perspective, research has found. aywan88/Getty Images hide caption

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