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From NASA: Apollo 12 commander Charles "Pete" Conrad unfurls the United States flag on the lunar surface during the first extravehicular activity on Nov. 19, 1969. NASA hide caption

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NASA

50 Years Ago, Americans Made The 2nd Moon Landing... Why Doesn't Anyone Remember?

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The Yale Babylonian Collection houses four unique tablets that contain various recipes for stews, soups and pies. Three of these tablets date back to the Old Babylonian period, no later than 1730 B.C. Klaus Wagensonner/Yale Babylonian Collection hide caption

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Klaus Wagensonner/Yale Babylonian Collection

Eat Like The Ancient Babylonians: Researchers Cook Up Nearly 4,000-Year-Old Recipes

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Susanna M. Hamilton/Broad Communications

Molecular Scissors Could Help Keep Some Viral Illnesses At Bay

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Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria — rod-shaped bacteria in this tinted, scanning electron microscope image — are found in soil, water and as normal flora in the human intestine. But they can cause serious wound, lung, skin and urinary tract infections, and many pseudomonas strains are drug-resistant. Science Photo Library/Science Source hide caption

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Science Photo Library/Science Source

How Best To Use The Few New Drugs To Treat Antibiotic-Resistant Germs?

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A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket lifts off Monday from Florida's Cape Canaveral Air Force Station carrying 60 Starlink satellites. The Starlink constellation eventually will consist of thousands of satellites designed to provide worldwide high-speed Internet service. Paul Hennessy/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Paul Hennessy/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Unlike most dairy cows in America, which are descended from just two bulls, this cow at Pennsylvania State University has a different ancestor: She is the daughter of a bull that lived decades ago, called University of Minnesota Cuthbert. The bull's frozen semen was preserved by the U.S. Agriculture Department. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

Nearly 30 years after its last documented sighting, a silver-backed chevrotain was spotted by a camera set up in the forest of southern Vietnam. Southern Institute of Ecology/Global Wildlife Conservation/Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research/NCNP hide caption

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Southern Institute of Ecology/Global Wildlife Conservation/Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research/NCNP

To deal with chronic pain, Pamela Bobb's morning routine now includes stretching and meditation at home in Fairfield Glade, Tenn. Bobb says this mind-body awareness intervention has greatly reduced the amount of painkiller she needs. Jessica Tezak for NPR hide caption

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Jessica Tezak for NPR

Meditation Reduced The Opioid Dose She Needs To Ease Chronic Pain By 75%

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The planet Mercury is seen in silhouette (lower left) as it transits across the face of the sun on May 9, 2016. Another transit of Mercury — the last one for 30 years — will take place Monday. Bill Ingalls/AP hide caption

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Bill Ingalls/AP

Maryland now offers the country's first master's degree in the study of the science and therapeutics of cannabis. Pictured, an employee places a bud into a bottle for a customer at a weed dispensary in Denver, Colo. Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg via Getty Images

You Can Get A Master's In Medical Cannabis In Maryland

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Mourners hold candles as they gather for a vigil at a memorial outside Cielo Vista Walmart in El Paso, Texas, U.S., on Wednesday, Aug. 7, 2019. Luke E. Montavon/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Luke E. Montavon/Bloomberg/Getty Images

Two fourth-graders rock side to side while doing math equations at Charles Pinckney Elementary School's "Brain Room" in Charleston, S.C., in 2015. John McDonnell/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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John McDonnell/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Augustine of Hippo was among those in the Catholic Church who championed its eventual rejection of intrafamily marriages, which researchers say may have paved the way for a breakdown of extended family networks in Western Europe. Fine Art Images/Heritage Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Fine Art Images/Heritage Images/Getty Images

Indonesians independently carry out fumigation in their neighborhood to eradicate the larvae of mosquitoes that cause dengue fever. A new vaccine to prevent dengue may be on the horizon. Aditya Irawan/NurPhoto/Getty Images hide caption

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Aditya Irawan/NurPhoto/Getty Images

Ron Peters gives a tour of the rivers and waterways that run through Ellicott City. Peters installed security cameras around Ellicott City after the 2016 flood to learn more about how flooding in Ellicott City happens. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

Cards representing AIDS victims are held aloft during a 1983 interdenominational service in New York's Central Park. Charles Ruppmann/NY Daily News via Getty Images hide caption

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Charles Ruppmann/NY Daily News via Getty Images

How The World Has Changed! Science During The 40 Years Of 'Morning Edition'

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Malassezia is a genus of fungi naturally found on the skin surfaces of many animals, including humans. The researchers found it in urban apartments, although some strains have been known to cause infections in hospitals. Science Source hide caption

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Science Source