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A prototype of SpaceX's Starship stands at the company's Texas launch facility on Saturday. The Starship spacecraft is a massive vehicle designed to eventually be able to take people to the moon, Mars and beyond. Loren Elliott/Getty Images hide caption

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Loren Elliott/Getty Images

A team of scientists used a telescope at the Calar Alto Observatory in Spain to detect a gas giant orbiting a tiny red star some 30 light-years from Earth. Baback Tafreshi/Science Source/Getty Images hide caption

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Baback Tafreshi/Science Source/Getty Images

A Peculiar Solar System Has Scientists Rethinking Theories Of How Planets Form

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NASA's Dragonfly mission will hop across Saturn's moon Titan, taking samples and photos. Johns Hopkins APL hide caption

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Johns Hopkins APL

Meet The Nuclear-Powered Self-Driving Drone NASA Is Sending To A Moon Of Saturn

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Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) Chairman Kailasavadivoo Sivan displays a model of Chandrayaan 2 orbiter and rover during a press conference at their headquarters in Bangalore, India on Aug. 20. Aijaz Rahi/AP hide caption

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Aijaz Rahi/AP

India Spacecraft Located, Condition Unknown

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Indian Space Research Organization employees react as they learn that mission control lost communication with its unmanned landing module moments before it touched down on the moon's south pole Saturday (local time.) Aijaz Rahi/AP hide caption

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Aijaz Rahi/AP

Vice President Pence speaks during a meeting of the National Space Council last week in Chantilly, Va. Pence and President Trump have pushed hard for the establishment of a separate Space Force — and they hope the revival of U.S. Space Command will help get them there. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

A ULA Atlas V rocket carrying a U.S. Air Force Space and Missile Systems Center mission launched Thursday at Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Walter Scriptunas II/Courtesy United Launch Alliance hide caption

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Walter Scriptunas II/Courtesy United Launch Alliance

One of the 54 steerable dishes that make up much of the Atacama Large Millimeter Array in Chile's Atacama Desert. This one is 39 feet in diameter. Kathy Hudson/Hudson Works hide caption

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Kathy Hudson/Hudson Works

Chile And Telescopes Are A Match Made In Heaven

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NASA Mission Control founder Chris Kraft in the old mission control at Johnson Space Center in Houston. This original mission control of the Apollo era is a national historic landmark. David J. Phillip/AP hide caption

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David J. Phillip/AP

Chris Kraft, One Of The Architects Of The U.S. Space Program, Dies At 95

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Through a webcast, a man at New Delhi's Nehru Planetarium takes pictures of the liftoff of the Indian Space Research Organization's unmanned spacecraft, launched Monday on a mission to the far side of the moon. Manish Swarup/AP hide caption

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Manish Swarup/AP

Some of the space food that was scheduled to be carried on the Apollo 11 lunar landing mission included (from left to right): chicken and vegetables, beef hash, and beef and gravy. Bettmann/Bettmann Archive hide caption

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Bettmann/Bettmann Archive

Michael Collins, center, poses with Neil Armstrong, left, and Edwin "Buzz" Aldrin Jr. for a group portrait a few weeks before they took off to the moon in the Apollo 11 mission in 1969. Space Frontiers/Getty Images hide caption

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Space Frontiers/Getty Images

On Apollo 11 Anniversary, A Former Crew Member Reflects On The Lunar Trip

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Greg Force and Abby Force at StoryCorps in Greenville, S.C. Alletta Cooper/StoryCorps hide caption

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Alletta Cooper/StoryCorps

How A 10-Year-Old Boy Helped Apollo 11 Return To Earth

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American aerospace engineer John Houbolt as he stands at a chalkboard in July 1962 showing his lunar orbit rendezvous plan for landing astronauts on the moon. NASA/LARC/Bob Nye/PhotoQuest/Getty Images hide caption

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NASA/LARC/Bob Nye/PhotoQuest/Getty Images

(Left) The Apollo 11 command and service modules are mated to the Saturn V lunar module adapter. (Right) The Apollo 11 spacecraft command module is loaded aboard a Super Guppy aircraft at Ellington Air Force Base for shipment to North American Rockwell Corp. NASA hide caption

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NASA

The Making Of Apollo's Command Module: 2 Engineers Recall Tragedy And Triumph

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Native Hawaiians have objected to construction of the Thirty Meter Telescope for years. On Monday, about 300 protesters arrived to block workers from accessing the site on a mountain believed to be sacred land. TMT via AP hide caption

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TMT via AP