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A mail carrier for the U.S. Postal Service makes deliveries at a Florida apartment complex in June 2018. The USPS has partnered with TuSimple to launch a multistate driverless semitruck test program on Tuesday. It doesn't involve home deliveries. Brynn Anderson/AP hide caption

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Brynn Anderson/AP

Ashley Merson and her brother Kevin sit on the porch of the house Ashley is trying to buy in the Hampden neighborhood of Baltimore. A ransomware attack on the city's digital services has delayed the home purchase. Emily Sullivan/WYPR hide caption

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Emily Sullivan/WYPR

Ransomware Cyberattacks Knock Baltimore's City Services Offline

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A Chinese man is silhouetted near the Huawei logo in Beijing on Thursday. The Trump administration issued an executive order Wednesday apparently aimed at banning Huawei equipment from U.S. networks. Ng Han Guan/AP hide caption

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Ng Han Guan/AP

Rich Isaacson, seen in his backyard in Pentagon City, Va., wrote his thesis on gravitational waves and says he always thought their existence would be proved sometime during his career. But he didn't realize that trying to see them would become his career. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

Billion-Dollar Gamble: How A 'Singular Hero' Helped Start A New Field In Physics

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At the European Union law enforcement agency Europol on Thursday, authorities announced details of a coordinated operation to dismantle an international cybercrime network. Peter Dejong/AP hide caption

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Peter Dejong/AP

A Republican observer looks at a ballot during a hand recount last November in Broward County, Fla. Florida officials and lawmakers are still learning about cyberattacks there. Wilfredo Lee/AP hide caption

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Wilfredo Lee/AP

'Possible' More Counties Than Now Known Were Hacked In 2016, Fla. Delegation Says

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The Huawei Technologies Ltd. business location in Plano, Texas. Trump's executive order does not name Huawei, but it appears to be directed at the Chinese telecom manufacturer. Tony Gutierrez/AP hide caption

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Tony Gutierrez/AP

Dr. Randall Bly, an assistant professor of otolaryngology-head and neck surgery at the University of Washington School of Medicine who practices at Seattle Children's Hospital, uses the experimental smartphone app and a paper funnel to check his daughter's ear. Dennis Wise/University of Washington hide caption

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Dennis Wise/University of Washington

New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern is calling on governments and tech companies to do more to prevent livestreaming of terrorist attacks and the spread of such videos online. Ardern is seen here laying a wreath at the Auckland War Memorial Museum in Auckland last month. Mark Tantrum/The New Zealand Government via Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Tantrum/The New Zealand Government via Getty Images

In this Oct. 31 photo, a man has his face painted to represent efforts to defeat facial recognition. It was during a protest at Amazon headquarters over the company's facial recognition system. Elaine Thompson/AP hide caption

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Elaine Thompson/AP

A technician works in a lab at GeseDNA Technology in Beijing. To counter China, the U.S. plans to impose new export restrictions on "emerging and foundational technology" that researchers say could affect the way they share genetic materials with international labs. Greg Baker/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Greg Baker/AFP/Getty Images

Stopping Key Tech Exports To China Could Backfire, Researchers And Firms Say

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Liz O'Sullivan says she struggled for months as she learned more about the military project her in which her employer, Clarifai, was participating. Jasmine Garsd/NPR hide caption

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Jasmine Garsd/NPR

When Technology Can Be Used To Build Weapons, Some Workers Take A Stand

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Supreme Court Justices Neil Gorsuch (left) and Brett Kavanaugh wrote opposing opinions in a high-profile case involving Apple's App Store. The two Trump appointees are seen here at the Capitol in February. Doug Mills/Pool / Reuters hide caption

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Doug Mills/Pool / Reuters