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Years ago, Portia Smith (center) was afraid to seek care for her postpartum depression because she feared child welfare involvement. She and her daughters Shanell Smith (right), 19, and Najai Jones Smith (left), 15, pose for a selfie in February after makeup artist Najai made up everyone as they were getting ready at home to go to a movie together. Tom Gralish/Philadelphia Inquirer hide caption

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Tom Gralish/Philadelphia Inquirer

Black Mothers Get Less Treatment For Their Postpartum Depression

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We're tethered to our brothers and sisters as adults far longer than we are as children; our sibling relationships, in fact, are the longest-lasting family ties we have. Katherine Streeter for NPR hide caption

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Katherine Streeter for NPR
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A Saner Mindset For Weight Loss

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Eating fish can protect against heart disease but many people don't eat enough to be effective. In November, an FDA panel recommended broader use of a prescription-strength fish oil drug Vascepa for people at higher risk of heart disease. Enn Li Photography/Getty Images hide caption

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Enn Li Photography/Getty Images

For Your Heart, Eat Fish Or Take Pills? Now There's A Drug Equal To 8 Salmon Servings

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Being overweight or obese can diminish the effectiveness of a flu shot, researchers say. Derek Davis/Portland Press Herald/Getty Images hide caption

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Derek Davis/Portland Press Herald/Getty Images

Excess Weight Can Weaken The Flu Shot

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Samples of Silestone, a countertop material made of quartz. Cutting the material releases dangerous silica dust that can damage people's lungs if the exposure to the dust is not properly controlled. Catie Dull/NPR hide caption

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Catie Dull/NPR

'It's Going To Get Worse': How U.S. Countertop Workers Started Getting Sick

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The brain analyzes changes in sound volume to detect syllables and make sense of speech. filo/Getty Images hide caption

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filo/Getty Images

The Loudness Of Vowels Helps The Brain Break Down Speech Into Syl-La-Bles

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Stephanie Rinka in her beach wheelchair at Fort Fisher State Recreation Area, North Carolina. Courtesy of John Rinka hide caption

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Courtesy of John Rinka

As part of a clinical trial to treat sickle cell disease, Victoria Gray (center) has vials of blood drawn by nurses Bonnie Carroll (left) and Kayla Jordan at TriStar Centennial Medical Center in Nashville, Tenn. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

Gene-Edited 'Supercells' Make Progress In Fight Against Sickle Cell Disease

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Getting a handle on evolving vape culture means exploring the complex realm of subspecialists: "cloud chasers," "coil builders" and other people who identify as vape modders. Kiszon Pascal/Getty Images hide caption

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Kiszon Pascal/Getty Images

To deal with chronic pain, Pamela Bobb's morning routine now includes stretching and meditation at home in Fairfield Glade, Tenn. Bobb says this mind-body awareness intervention has greatly reduced the amount of painkiller she needs. Jessica Tezak for NPR hide caption

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Jessica Tezak for NPR

Meditation Reduced The Opioid Dose She Needs To Ease Chronic Pain By 75%

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Mourners hold candles as they gather for a vigil at a memorial outside Cielo Vista Walmart in El Paso, Texas, U.S., on Wednesday, Aug. 7, 2019. Luke E. Montavon/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Luke E. Montavon/Bloomberg/Getty Images

Tom and Dana Saputo sit in their backyard with their three dogs. Tom Saputo's double-lung transplant was fully covered by insurance, but he was responsible for an $11,524.79 portion of the charge for an air ambulance ride. Anna Almendrala/KHN hide caption

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Anna Almendrala/KHN

Cover detail of Volume Control, by David Owen. Penguin Random House hide caption

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Penguin Random House

From Lawn Mowers To Rock Concerts, Our 'Deafening World' Is Hurting Our Ears

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Trina Dalziel/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Trust Your Gut: A Beginner's Guide To Intuitive Eating

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A large study published in late October found that weekly injections of Makena during the latter months of pregnancy "did not decrease recurrent preterm births." Jill Lehmann Photography/Getty Images hide caption

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Jill Lehmann Photography/Getty Images

Controversy Kicks Up Over A Drug Meant To Prevent Premature Birth

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Kristen Uroda for NPR

Diagnostic Gaps: Skin Comes In Many Shades And So Do Rashes

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To sleep better, exercise daily and limit caffeine and alcohol. Olivia Sun/NPR hide caption

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Olivia Sun/NPR

Body Clock Blues? Time Change Is Tough. Here's How To Sleep Well Tonight

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Psychologist Ken Carter studies why some people seek out haunted houses and other thrills — even though he's not one of them. Kay Hinton/Emory University hide caption

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Kay Hinton/Emory University

The Science Of Scary: Why It's So Fun To Be Freaked Out

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During deep sleep, waves of cerebrospinal fluid (blue) coincide with temporary decreases in blood flow (red). Less blood in the brain means more room for the fluid to carry away toxins, including those associated with Alzheimer's disease. Fultz et al. 2019 hide caption

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Fultz et al. 2019

How Deep Sleep May Help The Brain Clear Alzheimer's Toxins

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