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U.S. teens' use of e-cigarettes has doubled since 2017, according to the National Institute on Drug Abuse. Tony Dejak/AP hide caption

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Tony Dejak/AP

High School Vape Culture Can Be Almost As Hard To Shake As Addiction, Teens Say

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Jeri Seidman and her daughter Hannah lounge at their home in Charlottesville, Va. Hannah is a patient in a genetic risk study about Type 1 diabetes. Carlos Bernate for NPR hide caption

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Carlos Bernate for NPR

An Experimental Genetic Test Gives Early Warning For Kids At Risk Of Type 1 Diabetes

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Although Gray will finally go home to Forest, Miss., she will return to Nashville once a month for four months to undergo blood tests and a bone marrow biopsy. But, she says, the hardest part is over. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

A Patient Hopes Gene-Editing Can Help With Pain Of Sickle Cell Disease

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How does nicotine in e-cigarettes affect young brains? Researchers are teasing out answers. Research on young mice and rats shows how nicotine hijacks brain systems involved in learning, memory, impulse control and addiction. Gabby Jones/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Gabby Jones/Bloomberg via Getty Images

How Vaping Nicotine Can Affect A Teenage Brain

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A worker cuts black granite to make a countertop. Though granite, marble and "engineered stone" all can produce harmful silica dust when cut, ground or polished, the artificial stone typically contains much more silica, says a CDC researcher tracking cases of silicosis. danishkhan/Getty Images hide caption

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danishkhan/Getty Images

Workers Are Falling Ill, Even Dying, After Making Kitchen Countertops

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After finishing up some household chores, Brody Knapp gets a chance to play with his mother, Ashley, at their home in Kansas City, Mo. Alex Smith/KCUR hide caption

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Alex Smith/KCUR

Pediatricians Stand By Meds For ADHD, But Some Say Therapy Should Come First

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An unexpected charge related to a biopsy threatened the financial security of Brianna Snitchler and her partner. Callie Richmond for Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Callie Richmond for Kaiser Health News

A Biopsy Came With An Unexpected $2,170 'Cover Charge' For The Hospital

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U.S. adults put on about a pound a year on average. But people who had a regular nut-snacking habit put on less weight and had a lower risk of becoming obese over time, a new study finds. R.Tsubin/Getty Images hide caption

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R.Tsubin/Getty Images

Just A Handful Of Nuts May Help Keep Us From Packing On The Pounds As We Age

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In the alleged scheme, Medicare beneficiaries were offered, at no cost to them, genetic testing to estimate their cancer risk. Al Drago/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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U.S. Justice Department Charges 35 People In Fraudulent Genetic Testing Scheme

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Investigators have found that cannabis-containing vaping products are linked with many of the reported cases of vaping-related lung illness. Mike Wren/AP hide caption

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Mike Wren/AP

Triathletes who trained too much chose immediate gratification over long-term rewards, researchers found. Markus Büsges/EyeEm/Getty Images hide caption

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Markus Büsges/EyeEm/Getty Images

Too Much Training Can Tax Athletes' Brains

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Surveys done since the 2016 election show that engaging with politics is stressing people out and harming their mental health and relationships. Mark Makela/Getty Images hide caption

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Ruby Johnson, whose daughter was recently hospitalized with a respiratory illness from vaping, testified before a House Oversight subcommittee hearing on lung disease and e-cigarettes on Capitol Hill Tuesday. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

If E-Cigs Were Romaine Lettuce, They'd Be Off The Shelf, Vaper's Mom Tells Congress

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Lori Pinkley of Kansas City, Mo., has struggled with chronic pain since she was a teenager. She has found relief from low doses of naltrexone, a drug that at higher doses is used to treat addiction. Alex Smith/KCUR hide caption

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Alex Smith/KCUR

In Tiny Doses, An Addiction Medication Moonlights As A Treatment For Chronic Pain

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