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Lost Work Because Of Coronavirus? How To Get Unemployment, Skip Loan Payments And More

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Episode 986: America Unemployed

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When Should We Restart the Economy?

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About 90% of households — approximately 165 million — will benefit from direct payments, according to the Tax Policy Center. Xinhua News Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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The Labor Market Catastrophe

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A "closed" sign is posted at the entrance of a New York State Department of Labor office in Brooklyn. With millions of people filing for unemployment benefits, state employment agencies have been overwhelmed around the country. Andrew Kelly/Reuters hide caption

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Andrew Kelly/Reuters

A woman wearing gloves pays for her purchase at a supermarket in Los Angeles. Bank regulators are urging consumers not to hoard cash, after reports of large withdrawals by some customers worried about the coronavirus. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Don't Dash For Cash: Authorities Say There's No Need To Empty The ATM

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The attorneys general said some sellers on Craigslist and Facebook are jacking up prices on hand sanitizer by as much as 10 times the normal cost. Nicholas Kamm/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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The Sheetz gas and convenience store chain is boosting its workers' pay by $3 per hour, in response to the coronavirus outbreak. Its stores are among the businesses deemed essential during government-ordered shutdowns. Michael S.Williamson/The Washington Post via Getty Images hide caption

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U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos also announced the Department of Education would refund about $1.8 billion to the more than 830,000 borrowers who were in the process of having money withheld. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Pandemic Bonds

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Economists say helping the health care sector, including through emergency financing to states and cities, is one of the steps urgently needed to weather the coronavirus crisis. Michael Conroy/AP hide caption

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The Most Vulnerable Workers

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Angelica Rico says she lost all of her income this week when she was furloughed from her job as a digital marketing specialist. She doesn't know how she'll be able to pay rent on her apartment in Southern California. Courtesy of Autumn Littiken hide caption

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Courtesy of Autumn Littiken

Friday will be the last day of floor trading before the New York Stock Exchange switches to all-electronic trading starting Monday. Johannes Eisele/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Episode 982: How To Save The Economy Now

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A sign announcing "Free Lunch" appears at the New Heightz Grocery Store in Reading, Penn. on March 20, 2020. Owner Moises Abreu is giving out meals to help as people struggle with reductions resulting from the coronavirus. MediaNews Group/Reading Eagle vi/MediaNews Group via Getty Images hide caption

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'All Giving Is Very Necessary.' Ways To Give To Charity During The Coronavirus Crisis

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The federal government is telling lenders to lower or suspend mortgage payments for homeowners who have lost income because of the coronavirus outbreak. Mike Segar/Reuters hide caption

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U.S. Orders Up To A Yearlong Break On Mortgage Payments

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