Editors' Picks A selection of stories handpicked by NPR Music editors.

Editors' Picks

Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach's mercurial music, with its sparkle and unpredictability, was a departure from the style of his father, Johann Sebastian. De Agostini Picture Library/Getty Images hide caption

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De Agostini Picture Library/Getty Images

C.P.E. Bach: Mercurial Diversions For Uncertain Times

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Hot Country Knights is Dierks Bentley's loving parody of '90s country. The band released its debut album The K Is Silent May 8. Jim Wright/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Jim Wright/Courtesy of the artist

Riding 'The Mullet To Success': How Hot Country Knights Parodies The '90s

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DJ Premier is a purist at heart. He picks samples based on feeling and the beats he creates from them are all about honoring that vibe. That lineage has played out from his parents record collection growing up in Houston to his own expansive discography over the last 30 years. NPR hide caption

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Lucinda Williams sees her new album Good Souls Better Angels as part of a long line of political country music. "Go back and listen to Woody Guthrie. It is my job, as far as I'm concerned," she says. Danny Clinch/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Danny Clinch/Courtesy of the artist

'I Get Angry, Too': Lucinda Williams On Her Politically Charged New Album

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The title of Fiona Apple's Fetch the Bolt Cutters started as a line from a TV crime drama, but became the album's central message: "Fetch your tool of liberation. Set yourself free," Apple says. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Courtesy of the artist

'Fetch Your Tool Of Liberation': Fiona Apple On Setting Herself Free

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A second line in the Treme neighborhood of New Orleans, photographed on April 15, 2018. The parades, along with much else in the city, have been suspended amid the COVID-19 pandemic. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Spinning records backwards was once condemned as satanic. But when DJ Dahi reverses samples — or alters his voice — to produce hits for the likes of Pusha T, Kendrick Lamar or Childish Gambino, it's a ministry of texture and sound. NPR hide caption

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